Las Murallas and the Torre de Oro, Sevilla

The Romans were the first to build the defensive wall around the city of Sevilla, to protect it from possible invasions. At the end of the Roman Empire the wall was largely destroyed by the Vandals and later rebuilt by the Visigoths.

The walls that remain today are known as the ‘murallas’ and date from the time when Sevilla was occupied by the Moors. The wall was then six kilometres long and circled the whole city, but now only a 400 metre long section remains intact.

The remaining city walls begin at Puerta de la Macarena and end at Puerta de Córdoba. Initially there were 166 watchtowers and nine gates, however of those only three gates and eight towers remain.

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The Torre de Oro is one of the eight surviving towers from the original city walls and it dates back to the year 1220. After the reconquest of Sevilla the tower was used as a prison, however it is now home to the naval museum and contains models, navigation charts, compasses and ancient documents. Inside the tower, 91 steps lead visitors to the top where they can enjoy panoramic views of the city and the river.

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SOURCES:

  • http://www.aviewoncities.com/seville/murallas.htm
  • http://www.aviewoncities.com/seville/torredeloro.htm
  • http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/arte/monumentos/sevilla/la_torre_del_oro.html

Las Murallas and the Torre de Oro, Sevilla

by Uncover Travel time to read: 1 min
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