The Red Beaches of Rábida Island, The Galápagos

Rábida is one of the most volcanically varied islands in the archipelago. The island gained its ecuadorian name of Rábida after the convent of Rábida where Columbus left his son during his voyage to the Americas. It is a relatively small island, of less than five square kilometres and has a distinctive red colour, caused by the several small volcanic craters and the high amount of iron in the lava.

Originally named Jervis after British admiral John Jervis, it is one of the most colourful islands in the archipelago. The island’s red beaches are home to colonies of sea lions and the surrounding waters are teeming with tropical fish, making it a popular snorkelling site. The island also a birdwatchers’ paradise with nine species of finch, Galápagos hawks, brown pelicans, doves and flamingos all making their home on the island.

White tip reef sharks frequent the waters around the islands and are often seen by snorkelers as they rest in the shallow waters. The white tip reef shark is one of about 400 species of sharks found in the world and can be distinguished by the white tip on its first dorsal fin and the upper caudal fins. This species of shark is common in the Galápagos; they can grow to over two metres and are generally curious and gentle. They are nocturnal and feed primarily on crustceans, mollusks, small fish and octopus

Green sea turtles and sea lions are also commonly seen in these waters. Playful sea lions often approach visitors, swimming alongside them or playfully splashing them with water.

IMG_5793

SOURCES:

  • http://galapagos.irg/about_galapagos/rabida/
  • http://aboutgalapagos.nathab.com/the-islands/rabida-jervis/
  • https://www.galapagosislands.com/visitor-sites/rabida.html
  • https://animalcorner.co.uk/rabida-island/
  • http://metropolitan-touring.com/content.asp?id_page=983

Leave a Reply

The Red Beaches of Rábida Island, The Galápagos

by Uncover Travel time to read: 1 min
0
Skip to toolbar