San Cristóbal Tortoise – Geochelone chatamensis

The San Cristóbal tortoise’s shape is between the two main morphological forms of the Galápagos tortoises. Males have a saddle-backed shape and females and young males are wider in the middle and more domed in shape.

On the island of San Cristóbal there were originally two populations of tortoises; one in the northeast, which remains to this day and currently consists of around 1,400 individuals, and another in the south of the island that became extinct due to the exploitation of the species for meat and oil and the introduction of non-native predators to the islands (such as goats, rats and pigs).

San Cristóbal tortoises mate once per year and lay between 12 and 16 eggs and a reserve on the island runs a programme to breed the tortoises in captivity before releasing them back into the wild on their ancestral home lands.

San Cristóbal Tortoise – Geochelone chatamensis

by Uncover Travel time to read: 1 min
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