The Green Beach on Floreana Island, The Galápagos

The green sand beach at Cormorant Point is a known nesting area for sea turtles. The green tinge in the sand is due to the large amount of olivine crystals that have been expelled from nearby tuff cones by the wind. A tuff cone is a type of volcanic rock which is formed by the interaction of basaltic magma (molten volcanic rock beneath the surface of the earth) and water.

This beach is also a popular spot for sally lightfoot crabs, also known as red rock crabs. Adults vary in colour, from reddish-brown, to mottled or spotted brown, pink or yellow. When they are young they are dark brown, which allows them to camouflage easily with the volcanic rocks. They are the most common saltwater crabs along the western coast of South America and are one of the few saltwater crabs that inhabit the Galápagos Islands. Sally lightfoot crabs are between eight to twelve centimetres in length and are flat and low to the ground.

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In the shallow shoreline waters, several species of rays can often be seen. Green sea urchins and vegetation unique to this part of the island, such as the Floreana daisy are also found here.

SOURCES:

  • http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/education/glossary.html
  • http://www.galapagos.org/about_galapagos/about-galapagos/the-islands/floreana/
  • http://www.galapagosexpeditions.com/islands/sally-lightfoot-crabs.php
  • http://cruiseweb.com/ports/departs-cormorant-point-(floreana)-galapagos-islands

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The Green Beach on Floreana Island, The Galápagos

by Uncover Travel time to read: 1 min
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